Parramatta River Cat Ferries

Parramatta River Cat Ferries

For those who must do the ferry return to the city this is the best one. It is far less crowded, and travels much faster than the big ferry. We do not guarantee this ferry return to the city but there there is a ferry every 30 minutes or so.

There is a ferry departure at 5.50 pm and arrives at Circular Quay at 6.20 pm, and another departure at 6.30 pm. The 5.50 pm ferry passes the large ferry en route which left about 30 minutes earlier.

All boats create wake and the larger boat the more wake created as the speed increases. These ferries were designed in North Queensland for Sydney’s river system and were introduced in the 1990’s.

These unique boats are specially designed to have a high speed with very little wake which is the scourge of ferries all over the world. By using a long catamaran construction from a design to eliminate wake. It has been a very successful investment.

Sydney ferries has 7 of these boats which have been in service for well over 20 years. This Ferry costs $10 per person and we do not include this ferry on our tours. We prefer to have more time in the mountains and take the opportunity to do the rides more than once as we have plenty of time.

Specifications

Length 38 metres

Draft 1.4metres

Beam 10 metres

Passengers 230

Speed 22 knots (41 klms per hour)

Jenolan Caves Blue Mountains

Jenolan Caves Blue Mountains

These caves are located near the town of Oberon. This area is a protected area within the Blue Mountains national Park. Of all the caves in the world the Jenolan Caves system is recognized as the oldest geological formation.The clay has been dated by Sydney University to be 340 million years old. There are over 40 klms of Chambers and more than 300 entrances this system of caves is very complex. 11 Caves are open to the public. In 1867 the Jenolan Caves was the first reserve ever to be set aside for preservation in New South Wales.

The first electric lighting system was installed for the first time in the world into the Jenolan Caves Complex.

There is excellent accommodation and if you have the time you may wish to stay over.

Mount Victoria, the highest village in the Blue Mountains

Mount Victoria, the highest village in the Blue Mountains

Mount Victoria is on the edge of the western escarpment where you descend the Blue Mountains down on to the grazing land below. It is just far enough away from Sydney for people to call it home and lived there permanently and keeping the Sydney residence as the holiday home.

This western escarpment made for a difficult descent down from the mountains. A number of tracks were cleared for Cox’s road as it went down to the village of Hartley Vale. It was a most precarious descent and the coaches had to cut down a tree and drag it behind the coach to slow its descent. In later years another path down was found and called Victoria Pass but again it was too steep. Then a local businessman came up with a solution of a new ascent and it was called Burgoff’s pass. It is on the edge of the Western escarpment which takes you down into the grazing land is below. It had an easier climb and cars of that era could handle. Then in later years the Victoria Pass road was widened and it became the recognized route down. The railways overcame the problem with the Zig Zag technique as per the eastern side.

In the early days many families from Sydney built large mansions is in Mount Victoria as their country estate and many live there throughout the whole year to enjoy the crisp mountain air. In the early days it was known as One Tree Hill. A toll house was built in 1849 at a place called Broughton’s Waterhole. It was a small sandstone cottage of which there are only two left standing today the other one being in Windsor.

Tolls were collected on this Bathurst Road with wagons with heavy steel wheels were free of the toll because of the crushing affect on the stones on the main road and those with rubber tyres paid the toll of approximately $10 in today’s money.

Mount Wilson, the smallest village in the Blue Mountains

Mount Wilson, the smallest village in the Blue Mountains

Mount Wilson is the smallest of all the villages in the Blue Mountains. It is a unique location and accessed from the Bells Line of Road. It was named in 1870 and has become a small part of England. The residents love the cold Blue Mountains air. They moved to Mount Wilson and created a hamlet that you will find in England. Large Homes were built with vast gardens. There are hundreds of English trees and many of the residents are from England

It is a must see in the Autumn and the Spring for the colours in the gardens. If you’re travelling in your car around the Blue Mountains for a few days then Mount Wilson is a must visit location. There are no service stations, shops or stores so you need to be prepared but the scenery is just beautiful and a great location to commence many of the best walking trails in the Blue Mountains.

Various attractions are open all year round and some only in the Spring and Autumn. The Turkish Baths are unique and worth a visit. Check opening times before you go.

There is a variety of self contained accommodation and in the middle of winter on a cold weekend you can sit in front of an open fire with a good book without a sound except for the birds. Fantastic experience. There are many shorter walks of 4 to 5 hours duration and then back to the cottage for a hot bath and open a bottle of shiraz. Simply paradise!

Eagles Nest Lookout Blue Mountains

Eagles Nest Lookout Blue Mountains

This is another view of the Blue Mountains and the Three Sisters in the Jamison Valley. A favourite location with photographers who love the afternoon and evening sunlight on the Three Sisters to give a late afternoon glow, the photo at the front of this website was taken later in the afternoon and you can see the warm light of the